💡Strategise Market Views with Options. Hedge, Speculate & Earn with Strike's Option Tool.➡️

Bull Call Spread: Definition, How it Works, Trading, and Benefits          

Bull Call Spread: Definition, How it Works, Trading, and Benefits

Bull Call Spread: Definition, How it Works, Trading, and Benefits

A bull call spread is an options trading strategy used when the trader expects a moderate rise in the price of the underlying asset. Bull call spread involves buying a call option with a lower strike price and selling a call option with a higher strike price. The options have the same underlying asset and expiration date. 

The bull call spread limits both the maximum loss and maximum profit compared to simply buying a call option outright. The maximum loss is limited to the net premium paid for the two options, while the maximum profit is capped at the difference between the strike prices minus the net premium paid.

To implement a bull call spread, the trader would buy a call option with a lower strike price (this option has a higher premium cost) and sell a call option at a higher strike price (this option has a lower premium received) 

The net cost to establish the spread is the difference between the two premiums. This is the maximum potential loss if the underlying asset price stays below the lower strike at expiration.

The maximum profit is achieved if the asset price rises above the higher strike price at expiration. In that case, the purchased lower strike call option would be in-the-money and have intrinsic value. The higher strike short call would expire worthless, so the trader could keep the entire premium received. 

The bull call spread has limited upside profit potential but reduces the upfront capital required compared to buying a call option by itself. It is profitable as long as the asset price rises above the breakeven point by expiration. The breakeven is the lower strike plus net premium paid.

What is Bull Call Spread?

A bull call spread is an options trading strategy used to profit from a moderate rise in the price of the underlying asset. It involves simultaneously buying and selling call options on the same underlying asset with the same expiration date but at different strike prices. 

What is Bull Call Spread
Bull Call Spread: Definition, How it Works, Trading, and Benefits 7

Specifically, a bull call spread is created by buying a call option with a lower strike price. 

And selling a call option with a higher strike price.

Both call options have the same underlying security and expiration date. The lower strike call option that is purchased has a higher premium cost, while the higher strike call that is sold has a lower premium received.  

The net cost to establish the bull call spread is the difference between the premium paid for the long lower strike call and the premium received for the short higher strike call. This net debit cost is also the maximum potential loss if the underlying asset price stays below the lower strike price at expiration.

The maximum profit potential occurs if the underlying asset price rises above the higher strike price of the short call option at expiration. In this case, the purchased lower strike call would have an intrinsic value equal to the difference between the underlying price and the lower strike price. Meanwhile, the short call expires worthless because it is out of money. The trader pockets the premium received for selling the higher strike call, which, combined with the intrinsic value of the long call, equals the maximum profit.

The key benefit of a bull call spread is it clearly defines both the maximum profit and maximum loss up front. The maximum loss risk is capped at the net premium paid to establish the position. The maximum profit is capped at the difference between the strike prices of the calls minus the net premium. 

A bull call spread is used when the trader has a moderately bullish outlook on the underlying asset and expects a modest rise in the price by expiration. It provides exposure to upside gains if the asset price rises while limiting the maximum loss if the asset stays flat or declines.

The breakeven point for the strategy is the strike price of the long call plus the net premium paid. The asset price must rise above this level by expiration for the bull call spread to be profitable. 

Reasons traders implement a bull call spread include.

Caps the maximum potential loss compared to simply buying call options outright.

Still provides exposure to upside gains if bullish on the asset.

Requires less upfront capital than purchasing call options by themselves.

The trade-off is the bull call spread has limited profit potential since the gains are capped. Traders give up unlimited upside in exchange for defining risk.

For the bull call spread trader, time decay and declining implied volatility are beneficial. As the time to expiration decreases, the value of both the long and short call options declines, but the short call declines faster which helps the position. Lower implied volatility also erodes the value of the options but again benefits the spread position.

What is the other term for Bull Call Spread?

The most common other terms used for a bull call spread strategy include debit call spread, vertical call credit spread, and vertical call debit spread.

Debit Call Spread refers to the fact that establishing a bull call spread has a net upfront cost or debit. Since you are buying the lower strike call for a premium and selling the higher strike call for a lower premium, there is a net debit to put on the trade.

Debit call spread and bull call spread are interchangeable terms. Both indicate buying the lower strike call and selling the higher strike call for a net debit.

Vertical Call Credit Spread refers to the same bull call spread construction – long lower strike call and short higher strike call. The “vertical” indicates it is composed of options at different strikes but with the same expiration.

It is referred to as a “credit” spread from the perspective of the opposite position – if you were short the lower strike call and long the higher strike call, this would produce a net credit. Hence, bull call spreads can also be referred to as vertical call credit spreads.

How does Bull Call Spread work?

A bull call spread is implemented when a trader has a moderately bullish outlook on an underlying asset and wants to profit from a potential rise in the price. It involves buying one call option and selling another call option at a higher strike price. 

How does Bull Call Spread work
Bull Call Spread: Definition, How it Works, Trading, and Benefits 8

To establish a bull call spread, the trader would buy a call option on the underlying asset with a lower strike price. For example, buying a 50-strike call option. And sell a call option on the same underlying with a higher strike price. For example, selling a 60-strike call option. 

Both calls would have the same expiration date. Typically, the long call is purchased at or in-the-money, while the short call is sold out-of-the-money. The purchased lower strike call option has a higher premium cost, while the sold higher strike call generates premium income from the sale. The net effect is the trader pays a debit to put on the bull call spread trade. The total debit paid is the maximum potential loss if the underlying asset stays below the lower strike price by expiration. On the upside, the maximum profit is capped and achieved if the underlying price rises above the higher strike of the short call by the expiration date. 

At expiration, there are a few potential scenarios. Both options expire worthless if the asset price is below the lower strike of the long call. The trader loses the full debit paid. The price is between the strike prices, which means the long call has no intrinsic value while the short call expires worthless. Again, the trader loses just the debit cost. 

The purchased lower strike call is in the money and has an intrinsic value equal to the difference between the asset price and the lower strike if the asset price rises above the higher strike at expiration. The short call expires worthless. The trader’s total profit is the intrinsic value of the long call plus the premium received from the short call sale, less the initial debit paid. The maximum gain is capped at the difference between the strike prices and the debit cost.

A bull call spread benefits from time decay as duration declines. Implied volatility drops also help the position. The short call loses value faster than the long call as expiration approaches, boosting the spread value.

The breakeven point is the lower strike price plus the net debit paid. This must be exceeded for the trade to have a profit. 

The bull call spread clearly defines maximum profit and loss upfront while allowing the trader to benefit from a moderate rise in the asset price. The cost of entry is lower than buying calls outright, but gains are capped. It is a strategy best suited when moderately bullish on the direction of the underlying asset price.

How does Bull Call Spread differ from other types of Vertical Spreads?

A bull call spread is a type of vertical spread strategy involving the simultaneous purchase and sale of call options at different strike prices. Other common vertical spread strategies include the bear call spread, bull put spread, and bear put spread.

The key differences between a bull call spread and these other vertical spreads are below.

Bull Put Spread 

– Bull call spread buys lower strike call, sells higher strike call

– Bull put spread buys lower strike put, sells higher strike put

A bull put spread has a bearish outlook and profits if the underlying price falls. It is the put option equivalent of a bull call spread. The maximum gain occurs if the asset price goes below the lower strike put by expiration.

Bear Call Spread

– Bull call spread has net debit, bear call spread has net credit

– Bull call spread profits if price rises, bear call spread profits if price falls

A bear call spread involves selling the lower strike call and buying the higher strike call, resulting in a net credit. It aims to profit from a decline in the underlying asset price, unlike the bull call spread, which wants the price to rise.

Bear Put Spread

– Bull call spread buys lower strike call, bear put spread sells lower strike put

– Bull call spread wants rising price, bear put decreasing price

The bear put spread sells the lower strike put and buys the higher strike put for credit. It makes money if the asset price falls below the lower strike at expiration – the opposite desired direction of the bull call spread.

The bull call spread is used when moderately bullish on the asset price. It risks a small debit cost for the upside potential if the price rises. The other spreads target either bearish outlooks or more substantial price movements up or down.

Understanding these differences allows traders to deploy the best vertical spread strategy based on their market outlook and risk appetite. A bull call spread offers flexibility for a modestly bullish view of the underlying asset.

What is the importance of Bull Call Spread in Options Trading?

Bull call spreads are an important options trading strategy as they provide a flexible and defined-risk approach to profit from a moderately bullish outlook on an asset. Several key benefits underscore the importance of bull call spreads for options traders:

Unlike simply buying call options outright, a bull call spread limits the maximum loss an options trader can experience. The most that can be lost is the net debit paid to enter the trade. The long/short call spread structure creates a fixed loss amount known at entry.

While capping the downside risk, a bull call spread still provides upside potential. If the asset price rises above the short call strike at expiration, the maximum profit is realized. The ability to participate in upside price action while limiting downside risk is what makes bull call spreads attractive.

Buying call options alone requires more capital. With a bull call spread, the sale of the higher strike call helps offset the cost of the lower strike long call. This lowers the capital outlay and provides greater leverage than call buying.

Bull call spreads can be used across a wide variety of asset classes like stocks, ETFs, futures, and forex. They provide versatility to implement this strategy on a broad selection of underlying securities.

As options approach expiration, time decay accelerates. This erosion of extrinsic value benefits a bull call spread position, helping to boost its value.

Since there is one long call and one short call, declining implied volatility will have a net positive impact on a bull call spread. Lower IV helps the position.

How to enter a Bull Call Spread?

A bull call spread is entered by buying a lower strike call option and selling a higher strike call option on the same underlying asset with the same expiration date. First, the trader needs to define their market outlook and suitable strike prices for the spread. A bull call spread has a moderately bullish bias, so expect some upside in the asset price. Select lower and higher strike prices that capture the expected price movement. Popular choices are picking strikes just in or out of the money.

The next step is buying the call option with the lower defined strike price. For example, buying the 50 strike call on the stock trading at Rs.48. This is the long call leg of the spread with a higher premium cost.

Now, sell the call option at the chosen higher strike price. For example, selling the 55 strike call if the stock is at Rs.48. This short call leg has a lower premium received.

Subtract the premium received for the short call from the long call premium paid. This is the net debit required to enter the trade. The net debit is also the maximum potential loss if the stock stays below the long call strike at expiration.

The maximum loss is capped at the net debit amount. The maximum gain is the difference between the strike prices and the debit if the stock finishes above the short call strike at expiration.

Work the order to simultaneously buy the long call and sell the short call as a net debit transaction. Consider using a limit order to control the entry cost. Monitor the bull call spread through expiration. If it goes into the money, consider closing both legs together to lock in profits prior to expiration. Adjust or roll as needed if the market outlook changes.

The key steps are picking suitable strike prices to match your bullish outlook, buying the lower strike call, selling the higher strike call, checking the net debit cost, defining the risk-reward payoff, placing the net debit order, and managing through expiration.

Following these guidelines allows traders to implement bull call spread trades efficiently. Be sure to understand the impact of time decay, volatility, and the breakeven point so you can monitor and adjust the position accordingly. Use stop-loss orders to contain potential losses. With the right outlook, position sizing, and ongoing management, bull call spreads can provide attractive risk-reward trades.

How to Exit a Bull Call Spread?

Exiting a bull call spread involves closing out both the long and short call options positions. There are several approaches to exiting a bull call spread. One choice is to hold the bull call spread until expiration. At expiration, if the stock price is above the short call strike, maximum profit is realized. If below the long call strike, maximum loss occurs. The trade is automatically closed at expiration.

Alternatively, the spread can be closed before expiration. Reasons to exit early include locking in profits or cutting losses prior to expiration. Some key considerations for managing early exits are: Ideally, you want to close both legs at the same time for a net credit or debit to exit the trade. Legging out of spreads increases risks of wider bid/ask spreads or volatility skew.

If the market outlook changes, the bull call spread can be rolled to a later expiration or adjusted to different strike prices instead of closing the trade. For liquid options with tight bid/ask spreads, using Good Til Cancelled limit orders allows you to set an exit price level and capture that closing transaction automatically. 

As expiration approaches, carefully monitor time value decay and volatility skews, which can impact the timing of closing spreads. Manage early exits, taking this into account.

In terms of when to consider an early exit, here are some guidelines: Look to lock in partial or full profits once the position has achieved a good portion of the maximum gain. For example, if the spread reaches Rs.100 in potential profit on an Rs.120 maximum, it could exit at least partially. If the underlying price trend goes against the bullish outlook, close the spread to limit losses before hitting the maximum loss amount. Contain losses. If the underlying asset price spikes above the short call strike, look to lock in full max profit rather than risk a reversal lower. Capture gains with volatility spikes.

Can you close a Bull Call Spread early?

Yes, a bull call spread can certainly be closed out early before expiration. While a bull call spread has a defined maximum profit and loss at expiration, you do not have to hold until the expiration date to close the trade. It can be closed early to lock in profits or reduce losses.

What are the factors to consider in trading Bull Call Spread?

The most crucial components for trading bull call spreads include accurate market analysis, strategic strike selection, high liquidity options, optimized expiration, implied volatility impacts, technicals, and controlled position sizing. 

Market Outlook

The most important factor is having an appropriate bullish market outlook. A bull call spread aims to profit from a moderate upside in the underlying asset price. Without a bullish bias, other strategies may be better suited. Assess your fundamental and technical analysis to match the forecasted price movement to suitable strike prices.

Strike Price Selection

Carefully select the optimal strike prices for the long and short legs. Popular choices are picking strikes at, in, or just out of the money. Consider the risk-reward payoff, probability of profit, and required investment for different strike price combinations. Model pricing using options Greeks.

Liquidity

Sufficient liquidity in the options for both legs is key for easy order execution. Check open interest levels and bid/ask spreads. Wide markets increase slippage costs when entering and exiting spreads. Only trade highly liquid options with tight spreads.

Time to Expiration 

Shorter-term options decay faster but can be riskier. Longer terms have higher premium costs but more time. Pick an appropriate timeframe aligned with your outlook and targets. Typically, 30-60 days to expiration is optimal for many bull call spreads.

Implied Volatility 

Higher IV increases options premium costs but also upside profit potential. Lower IV decreases potential gains and losses. Understand how changes in volatility impact your position and adjust accordingly. Avoid trading spreads only before major events with anticipation priced in.

Technical Levels

Incorporate key technical analysis levels like support, resistance, and trends to help optimize strike selection, entry/exit points, and setting profit targets or stop losses. Use technicals to improve precision.

Position Sizing

Allocate an appropriate portion of capital to control position sizing risk. Wider spreads require more margin. Define sizing thresholds relative to account size and risk tolerances. Proper position sizing ensures survival and flexibility.

Blending these key factors helps generate consistent profits and constrained risk when trading bull call spreads.

What happens when a Bull Put Spread expires in the money?

A bull put spread expires in the money, which means the underlying asset price has fallen below the lower strike price of the long put. This results in maximum profit for the bull put spread. Specifically, at expiration, the long put option will have an intrinsic value equal to the difference between its lower strike price and the asset price.

Meanwhile, the short put option expires worthless as it is out of the money. The trader pockets the full premium received for selling the higher strike put. Combined with the intrinsic value of the long put, this equals the maximum possible gain. So, an in-the-money expiration is the best-case scenario for a bull put spread, allowing the trader to realize full profits.

How does the underlying asset impact Bull Call Spread premiums?

As the asset price rises, the value of the long lower strike call option increases. But the short, higher strike call premium decreases. This widens the spread value. If the asset price declines, the long call premium decreases faster than the short call. This narrows the net premium of the bull call spread. Higher implied volatility increases premiums for both legs but can widen the spread value.

Lower IV lowers overall premiums. Time decay erodes premiums evenly, but since there is one more short call, it decays marginally faster, benefiting the spread. In summary, bull call spread premiums are impacted by rises or drops in the underlying price, changes in volatility, and time decay effects. But overall, the position benefits from upward asset price movements.

What is an example of a Bull Call Spread?

Let’s say a trader has a moderately bullish outlook on stock XYZ, which is currently trading at Rs.50 per share. They decide to implement a bull call spread as follows:

– Buy 1 call option contract with a strike price of Rs.45 for a premium of Rs.5 

– Sell 1 call option contract with a strike price of Rs.55 for a premium of Rs.2

The net debit to enter the trade is Rs.3 (Rs.5 long call premium – Rs.2 short call credit).

The maximum loss on the trade is the Rs.3 debit if XYZ stock stays below Rs.45 at expiration.

The maximum profit is reached if XYZ closes above Rs.55 at expiration. In this case, the Rs.45 call would have Rs.10 of intrinsic value. Add the Rs.2 credit received and subtract the Rs.3 debit paid, giving a total profit potential of Rs.9.

The breakeven point is the Rs.45 strike plus Rs.3 debit, or Rs.48. XYZ needs to close above Rs.48 at expiration for the bull call spread to earn a profit.

This example shows how the long lower strike call option can profit from upside gains in XYZ stock while the short higher strike call generates income to offset the cost of the spread. The defined risk-reward parameters and breakeven point are set at entry.

What is the best Bull Call Spread strategy?

One of the most critical components of trading bull call spreads is carefully selecting the optimal strike prices for the long and short legs that align with your market outlook and risk tolerance. Consider going slightly in or out of the money on the strikes to balance the probability of profit and debit costs. Model different strike price scenarios using options Greeks to assess the risk-reward payoffs. Also, look for strikes that have liquid options trading sufficient volume. Getting the strike prices right lays the foundation for the trade. 

Another key is appropriately sizing your positions relative to your account size and the maximum risk you are willing to accept. Wider spreads and longer-dated options require more margin, so factor this in. Consider the percent of account value that would be lost if the maximum risk is reached and size accordingly to stay flexible. 

It’s also important to take steps to mitigate early assignment risk on the short call leg. You can avoid holding into dividends or close-to-earnings events. Also, monitor for deep in-the-money conditions that increase this risk.

Using limit orders when entering and exiting bull call spreads helps ensure favorable fill prices on both legs of the trade. You’ll want to monitor the bid/ask spread and aim for sufficient credit or debit between the midpoint on both sides.

Actively managing trades at 50% profit targets is another key. Look to take partial or full profits once the bull call spread reaches 50% or more of the maximum gain. Lock in gains as profit targets are hit.

Having a defined stop loss to close out losing trades also helps contain losses. For example, cutting losses at 50% of the maximum risk taken. Stick to the stop-loss discipline.  

If the underlying asset trend goes against your moderately bullish outlook, avoid holding into expiration to avoid maximum losses. Close spreads before expiration if the market is moving counter to the position.

Lastly, follow your brokerage’s expiration procedures for exercise and assignments. Manage any trades you hold into expiration carefully, and monitor for automatic exercise thresholds.

Using solid strike selection, controlled position sizing, limit orders, profit taking, stop losses, expiration management, and avoiding adverse trades into expiration are pillars for effective bull call spread trading.

Why would you buy a Bull Call Spread?

The primary reason to buy a bull call spread is to profit from a moderate rise in the underlying asset price while capping risk. The long call option provides leveraged upside exposure with limited capital outlay. The short call sold generates income to offset the cost of the spread. Here are some key advantages to buying bull call spreads.

Buying call options alone exposes the trader to substantial losses if the asset price drops. With a bull call spread, the maximum loss is strictly limited to the net debit paid upfront. The short call sold caps downside risk but retains some upside potential.

Buying calls outright requires more capital. With a bull call spread, the short call premium income partly offsets the cost of the long call. This lowers the capital needed to establish the position.

The bull call spread offers leveraged exposure to upside stock moves with lower capital at risk than buying the shares outright. This provides greater percentage returns on the amount invested.

A bull call spread allows modest profits if the stock price rises but stays between the strike prices at expiration. The long call gains value, while the short call expires worthless.

The maximum gain is capped if the stock closes above the short call strike at expiration. This defines clear profit targets based on the strikes chosen.

Is Bull Call Spread profitable?

Yes, bull call spreads can be profitable options trading strategies when used appropriately. Bull call spreads are executed by buying a lower strike call option and selling a higher strike call to offset part of the cost. A net debit is paid to enter the trade. The maximum loss on a bull call spread is limited to the initial debit paid. The maximum profit is capped if the underlying stock price rises above the short call strike at expiration.

Is it a good idea to sell a Bull Call Spread?

Yes, the defined risk-reward parameters make bull call spreads attractive when moderately bullish on a stock. They offer leveraged upside exposure while capping losses. Bull call spreads can be profitable if the stock price rises to any level above the breakeven point by expiration. The breakeven is the long strike plus debit paid.

What is the success rate of a Bull Call Spread?

The exact success rate of bull call spreads can vary substantially based on market conditions and implementation, but generally speaking, bull call spreads have a relatively low probability of profit. The typical estimated success rate is in the 25-40% range.

How can traders benefit from Bull Call Spread?

The primary advantage of bull call spreads is they strictly define and limit potential losses. The maximum loss is capped at the net debit paid upfront when entering the trade. This allows traders to establish leveraged stock market exposure while knowing the full extent of capital at risk. The short call leg sold offsets part of the premium paid for the long call purchased. This built-in protection is a key benefit compared to simply buying calls outright, which has an unlimited downside.

With the short call generating credit income, bull call spreads require less upfront capital than purchasing calls alone. This frees up trading capital for diversifying across more holdings while still benefiting from directional upside exposure. The lower capital needs also allow smaller account size traders to trade options spreads more easily.

While the max profit potential is capped, the probability of earning a profit is higher with bull call spreads compared to long calls. The breakeven stock price only needs to rise above the long strike price plus the net debit paid by expiration. This is typically a smaller required upside move with a higher probability of success.

Like standard call options, bull call spreads provide leveraged upside returns on the net capital invested. If a stock only rises 5%, a properly constructed spread can generate a 25-50% return on the debit amount paid. This boosts percentage gains.

Since maximum gains are achieved at the short call strike, bull call spreads provide clear profit-taking price points. Traders know the exact stock price at which they can collect full profits. This optimizes trade management and exiting with gains.

What is the possible risk of Bull Call Spread?

A key risk is the stock price finishing between the long and short call strikes at expiration. In this case, the trade reaches limited max profit well below the full potential. The long call gains some value but is offset by the short call. Monitoring price direction and managing early are essential.

If the underlying stock price trends lower and finishes below the long call strike price at expiration, the bull call spread loses the full premium paid. The long call expires worthless, and the short call credit provides minimal offset. Remaining bullish as the stock declines compounds losses.

While unlikely, there is a small risk of early assignment on the short call prior to expiration if it becomes deep in the money. This could force early unwinding of the spread at suboptimal prices. Avoid holding spreads into dividends or earnings dates to reduce this risk.

Depending on option liquidity, bid/ask spreads on each leg can be wider for spreads. This increases the cost of entering and exiting trades. Poor liquidity also makes balancing both legs more difficult. Monitoring spreads assists with proper trade entry and exit.

Changes in implied volatility skew between the different call strike prices impact the net pricing of the spread. Volatility skews are important to factor

What is the difference between a Bull Call Spread and a Bear Call Spread?

A bull call spread involves buying a lower strike call option and selling a higher strike call option. It requires a net debit to enter the trade. A bull call spreads profits if the stock price rises moderately above the break-even point by expiration. The maximum profit is capped if the stock closes above the short call strike at expiration. The maximum loss is limited to the initial net debit paid. A bull call spread benefits from a bullish outlook on the underlying stock.

In contrast, a bear call spread involves selling a lower strike call option and buying a higher strike call option. It generates a net credit when opening the trade. A bear call spreads profits if the stock price finishes below the lower call strike at expiration. The maximum profit is limited to the initial net credit received. The maximum loss occurs if the stock is above the higher call strike at expiration. A bear call spread benefits from a bearish outlook on the underlying stock.

What is the difference between a Bull Call Spread and a Bull Put Spread?

A bull call spread involves buying a lower strike call option and selling a higher strike call option. It requires a debit to enter the trade. A bull call spreads profits if the stock price rises above the break-even point. The maximum profit is capped if the stock finishes above the short call strike. A bull call spread benefits from a bullish outlook on the underlying stock.

In contrast, a bull put spread involves buying a higher strike put option and selling a lower strike put option. It also requires a debit to enter the trade. However, a bull put spread profits if the stock price falls below the break-even point. The maximum profit is capped if the stock finishes below the short put strike. A bull put spread benefits from a bearish outlook on the underlying stock.

Arjun
Arjun Remesh

Head of Content

Arjun is a seasoned stock market content expert with over 7 years of experience in stock market, technical & fundamental analysis. Since 2020, he has been a key contributor to Strike platform. Arjun is an active stock market investor with his in-depth stock market analysis knowledge. Arjun is also an certified stock market researcher from Indiacharts, mentored by Rohit Srivastava.

Shivam
Shivam Gaba

Reviewer of Content

Shivam is a stock market content expert with CFTe certification. He is been trading from last 8 years in indian stock market. He has a vast knowledge in technical analysis, financial market education, product management, risk assessment, derivatives trading & market Research. He won Zerodha 60-Day Challenge thrice in a row. He is being mentored by Rohit Srivastava, Indiacharts.

Share your thought on this article

0 / 5. 0

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recently Published

semi-circle-bg semi-circle-bg

Join the stock market revolution.

Get ahead of the learning curve, with knowledge delivered straight to your inbox. No spam, we keep it simple.